May 7, 2015
Vancouver, Canada

Advisory Board

Baron Mark Malloch-Brown

Mark Malloch-Brown is now with FTI Consulting, a leading global advisory firm. Formerly he was Minister of State in the Foreign Office, covering Africa and Asia, and was a member of Gordon Brown’s cabinet. He had previously served as Deputy Secretary-General and Chief of Staff of the UN under Kofi Annan. For six years he was Administrator of the UNDP, leading the UN’s development efforts around the world. Other positions have included vice-chairman of George Soros’s Investment Funds, as well as his Open Society Institute, a Vice-President at the World Bank and the lead international partner in a political consulting firm. He also has served as Vice-Chairman of the World Economic Forum.

He is chair of the Royal Africa Society and on a number of non-profit and advisory boards, including the International Crisis Group, the Open Society Foundation and the Centre for Global Development in Washington. He is a member of the House of Lords and was knighted in 2007.

Mark is also a Distinguished Practitioner of the Blavatnik School of Government at Oxford University and was formerly a visiting distinguished fellow at the Yale Centre for the Study of Globalisation.

He is the author of “The Unfinished Global Revolution” and in 2005 Time Magazine put him on its list of the 100 most influential people in the world.

 


Maria Livanos Cattaui

Maria Livanos Cattaui is a member of the Board of Directors of Petroplus Holdings, Switzerland. She was Secretary General of the International Chamber of Commerce from 1996 to 2005. Mrs Cattaui worked with the World Economic Forum in Geneva from 1977 to 1996, where she became Managing Director, responsible for the celebrated Annual Meeeting in Davos, building the public awareness it enjoys today.

She holds Executive Board, Board and Advisory Board memberships on the International Crisis Group, EastWest Institute, the Institute of International Education, the Elliott School of International Affairs (George Washington University), among others.

Mrs Cattaui, of Greek origin and Swiss nationality, was educated in the United States. She graduated with honors from Harvard University and holds an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from York University, Toronto.


lgLaura Gitman

Laura spearheads BSR’s New York office, working with multinational companies across a range of industry sectors and sustainability issues. She also serves on BSR’s Executive Committee and oversees global membership strategy and services.

She runs senior-level strategy workshops and multistakeholder forums, and has published reports on environmental, social, and governance integration in mainstream investing. From 2006 to 2010, Laura facilitated the Electronic Industry Citizenship Coalition, growing the initiative from 15 to more than 50 electronics companies. She also launched BSR’s global financial services and media practices.

Laura previously worked for Deloitte Consulting, where she acquired extensive strategy experience advising multinational financial services companies. She also managed a community development project in Ecuador, developed the business strategy for a startup, and worked with the biotechnology sector in Chile.

Laura holds an M.B.A. from Stanford University and a B.S. in Industrial and Labor Relations from Cornell University.


Frank Giustra

Mr. Giustra is President and CEO of Fiore Financial Corporation, a private firm managing a broad portfolio of private equity investments. Mr. Giustra has an established track record of building natural resource companies through access to capital and creative deal-making. As Chairman of Endeavour Financial from 2001 to 2007, his vision and leadership led to the successful launch of numerous resource companies, including Wheaton River Minerals (acquired by Goldcorp), Silver Wheaton and Pacific Rubiales Energy. Mr. Giustra’s entrepreneurial success also includes the founding of Lionsgate Entertainment, now one of the world’s largest independent film companies.

Mr. Giustra is a strong believer in philanthropy, and devotes much of his time to a variety of causes. In 1997, he established The Radcliffe Foundation, and holds the position of President. The Radcliffe Foundation supports a wide variety of international and local charities. Since 2005, Mr. Giustra has become an active executive member and significant contributor to the International Crisis Group. The International Crisis Group is widely recognized as the leading independent, non-partisan source of analysis and advice to policymakers on the prevention and resolution of deadly conflict.

In 2007, Mr. Giustra and former President Bill Clinton launched the Clinton Giustra Enterprise Partnership, with the focus of creating social and economic development programs in parts of the world where poverty is widespread, including Colombia, Peru, Mexico and Haiti.

Frank Giustra is a board member of Lionsgate Entertainment Corporation, Thunderbird Films, Endeavour Mining Corporation and Petromanas Energy Incorporated. In addition, he sits on boards of the Clinton Giustra Enterprise Partnership, The Bill, Hillary and Chelsea Foundation, International Crisis Group, The Radcliffe Foundation and Streetohome Foundation. Mr. Giustra is a Trustee of the Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts.


Ambassador Melanne Verveer

In 2009, President Obama nominated Melanne Verveer to be the first ever U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women’s Issues at the Department of State. Ambassador Verveer spent the past four years working with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton to coordinate foreign policy issues and activities relating to the political, economic and social advancement of women, traveling to nearly sixty countries. In such capacity, she worked to mobilize concrete support for women’s political and economic empowerment through public-private partnerships as well by working to fully integrate women’s participation and rights into U.S. foreign policy. President Obama also appointed Verveer to serve as U.S. Representative to the UN Commission on the Status of Women.

Today she is the Director of Georgetown University’s newly-established Institute for Women, Peace and Security. The Institute seeks to enhance national and global security by documenting the crucial role women play in peace-building and security through research and scholarship and by engaging global leaders from government, civil society and the private sector in conversations on the urgent issues of out times.

Ambassador Verveer is also the founding partner of Seneca Point Global, the global women strategy firm. SPG partners with leading companies and institutions to design, implement and measure integrated strategies that focus on women and girls and drive sustainable results – whether social, economic or both.

Prior to her role at the State Department, Ambassador Verveer served as Chair and Co-CEO of Vital Voices Global Partnership, an international NGO she co-founded to invest in emerging women leaders. Prior to Vital Voices, she served as Assistant to the President and Chief of Staff to the First Lady in the Clinton Administration. She was chief assistant to Hillary Clinton in her wide-ranging international activities to advance women’s rights and further social development, democracy and peace-building initiatives. She also led the effort to establish the President’s Interagency Council on Women and was instrumental in the adoption of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000. Prior to her time in the White House, Ambassador Verveer served in a number of leadership roles in public policy organizations and as congressional staff.

Ambassador Verveer has a B.S. and M.S. from Georgetown University. She is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Trilateral Commission and the World Bank Advisory Council on Gender and Development. She has served as the 2013 Humanitas visiting professor at Cambridge University. In 2008, the President of Ukraine awarded her the Order of Princess Olga. She holds several honorary degrees and is the recipient of numerous awards, including the U.S. Secretary of State’s Award for Distinguished Service.

Why This Issue?

Societies and companies, in particular, can—and must—integrate women economically if they are to remain competitive in the longer term. Why? It pays dividends, and some of the most influential companies in the world are paying attention. Unilever has opened markets and increased sales in India through female sales forces. Walmart has understood the benefits of including women in their supply chains. Coca Cola will be engaging over 5 million women entrepreneurs by 2020 to increase market share. Over the next decade, the economic impact of women will be at least as significant as that of China and India’s respective 1 billion plus populations. Simply put investing in women—in the work force, supply chains, and as consumers—is good business, and those firms that learn how to operationalize this understanding will be poised to thrive in the coming years. Learn more

Why should you attend?

This unique gathering will bring together senior-level corporate leaders from throughout Canada, United States, Europe and Asia to discuss practical ways in which women-- as consumers and employees, entrepreneurs and executives--are critical to the continuing success of companies in today’s competitive, international economy. Learn more

Why is this conference unique?

There is no shortage of evidence to suggest that focusing on innovative ways to address the challenges faced by women and girls will lead to better health and education systems, and safer, stronger communities for all people living in the developing and developed world. This conference will devote its primary focus to the economic potential of the next billion women on the planet.

While most discussions of women and girls understandably focus on the social and health benefits of greater inclusiveness, relatively less time has been dedicated to the important question of the critical role that women—as customers and employees, executives and entrepreneurs—are currently playing in transforming the global economy. A number of the world’s largest companies are moving beyond rhetoric and recognizing the link between the economic engagement of women and the bottom line. We believe that this issue will only be taken seriously by the private sector when it informs day-to-day business operations and is grounded in the unsentimental realities of the balance sheet. Learn more